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The Godbaby poster
Godbaby

Posted on 05 September 2012, 4:05

I’m a member of the team behind ChurchAds.Net, which has been producing national advertising campaigns for Christmas and Easter in the UK for almost 20 years. We’ve been running our ‘Christmas starts with Christ’ campaign for the past three Christmases, and the 2012 poster, featuring Godbaby, was launched yesterday. In the week or two leading up Christmas Day, Godbaby will be up there on billboards and bus shelters and outside local churches.

The poster comes with a choice of straplines. For a no-nonsense take on the incarnation, there’s ‘He cries. He wees. He saves the world.’ But for the faint of heart, which will probably include some churches, there’s the alternative version: ‘The gift that loves you back’. See both versions here.

I admire the poster for doing two things. First for talking in the language of today. During the autumn, advertising on buses, billboards and TV screens will be full of toys and products promising to make Christmas better. This poster will raise the same expectation, but it points to the Bethlehem baby as the one thing that can save us. And it undercuts commercial Christmas by saying in effect, ‘It’s not products you need, but Godbaby’.

Second, I appreciate its strong take on the God who becomes one of us to the point of bodily functions. For me, ‘He cries. He wees’ is a brilliant and unexpected connection between the world of dolls, where the hair ‘really grows’, and the world of the Christian faith, where God really becomes a living, breathing, crying, sneezing, weeing human being.

Some Christians will heartily dislike the boldness of that, which they’ll argue is irreverent or even blasphemous. In fact, hostile comment has already started to arrive, with someone emailing to call the poster ‘awful and repulsive’. That’s fair enough, as all Christians are entitled to have strong feelings about how their faith is publicly portrayed.

What do you think? Do you like the poster for its risk-taking attempt to communicate Jesus today? Do you disagree with it for portraying the Son of God as a plastic doll? Or what?

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Comments

It’s gone. Maybe it was a one-day event caused by a raider, spammer, nasty trojan planter person, subsequently cleaned up by Google. I’ve just checked YahooUK and also MetaCrawler, the search engine I use. No sign of it there, either.

Brian Barratt, Wed 5 Dec, 14:12

Thanks, Brian. I can’t find the ‘Guildford effect’ you’ve seen on Google. Can you let me know how you saw it?

Simon, Thu 29 Nov, 21:17

Simon, I’ve just done a search on Google for “Godbaby doll”, to see if it has been noticed. How is it that Guildford Diocese has been successful in swamping Google, with page after page of links? Something pretty suspect going on there! The only other main references seem to be critical or negative, arising from a piece in The Daily Mail. No other mentions in the British media. Hmmm.

Brian (Barratt)

Brian Barratt, Wed 28 Nov, 13:28


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